Volume 31, Issue 4 (9-2021)                   J Holist Nurs Midwifery 2021, 31(4): 227-235 | Back to browse issues page


XML Print


Download citation:
BibTeX | RIS | EndNote | Medlars | ProCite | Reference Manager | RefWorks
Send citation to:

Baghdadi A, Aghajani M, Sadat Z, Mirbagher Ajorpaz N. The Effects of Improving Emotional Intelligence on Death Anxiety in Older Adults. J Holist Nurs Midwifery. 2021; 31 (4) :227-235
URL: http://hnmj.gums.ac.ir/article-1-1738-en.html
1- Nursing (MSN), School of Nursing and Midwifery, Trauma Nursing Research Center, Kashan University of Medical Sciences, Kashan, Iran.
2- PhD candidate of Nursing, Department of Nursing and Midwifery, Infection Diseases Research Center, School of Nursing and Midwifery, Kashan University of Medical Sciences, Kashan, Iran.
3- Associate Professor, Department of Nursing, School of Nursing and Midwifery, Trauma Nursing Research Center, Kashan University of Medical Sciences, Kashan, Iran.
4- Associate Professor, Department of Nursing and Midwifery, Autoimmune Diseases Research Center, School of Nursing and Midwifery, Kashan University of Medical Sciences, Kashan, Iran. , mirbagher_n@kaums.ac.ir
Abstract:   (260 Views)
Introduction: Death anxiety is one of the main elements in mental health in older adults.
Objective: This study aimed to determine the effects of improving emotional intelligence on death anxiety in older adults in Kashan City, Iran.
Materials and Methods: This quasi-experimental study was carried out on 60 older adults referred to health clinics in Kashan City, Iran, in 2019. The participants were randomly allocated to the control and experimental groups. Before the intervention, a demographics data questionnaire and death anxiety scale was filled out by the two groups. The experimental group received emotional intelligence education in eight sessions (twice a week). The control group received no intervention. The study measures included a demographic checklist and the Templer Death Anxiety Scale (TDAS). Immediately and one month after the intervention, both groups filled out the death anxiety scale again. The collected data were analyzed using descriptive and analytical tests such as t test, the Chi-square, and repeated-measures Analysis of Variance (ANOVA).
Results: The results showed that 22 participants (73.3%) and 17 (56.7%) were in the 61-65 age range in the experimental and control groups, respectively. Based on the Chi-square test, there was no significant difference between the two groups regarding demographical data, including age, gender, marital status, education, and job. The results of repeated-measures ANOVA in the experimental group showed that the mean scores of death anxiety decreased over the 3 time points (P<0.05). Also, the post hoc test showed a significant difference in death anxiety scores at different time points in the experimental group (P<0.05). The t test results showed no statistically significant difference in the mean score of death anxiety before the intervention between the two groups, but at the end of the sessions (P=0.006) and one month after the intervention (P=0.001), this difference was significant.
Conclusion: The results indicated that improving emotional intelligence in older adults decreased their death anxiety. It is recommended that nurses use this method to decrease death anxiety in older adults.
Full-Text [PDF 557 kb]   (138 Downloads) |   |   Full-Text (HTML)  (62 Views)  
Article Type : Applicable | Subject: Special
Received: 2021/10/21 | Accepted: 2021/07/19 | Published: 2021/10/1

Add your comments about this article : Your username or Email:
CAPTCHA

Send email to the article author


Rights and permissions
Creative Commons License This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License.